Dear reader, during the entire month of June, enjoy twelve of our “Politics of Space and Bodies” issues for half the regular price here!

Cover Settler Colonialism in Turtle Island

#20 SETTLER COLONIALISM IN TURTLE ISLAND

Settler Colonialism in Turtle Island is a first ever issue of The Funambulist that was guest-edited by Turtle Island Indigenous scholars and activists Melanie K. Yazzie and Nick Estes. It proposes several facets of Indigenous struggles in Turtle Island. Most of them depict Native lives in spaces that are not the reservations where the colonial narrative usually situates them. Whether in large cities such as Los Angeles or Saskatoon or settler border towns in the periphery of reservations the urban dimension of the first half of the dossier is omnipresent.

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Contributors: Gabriel Varghese & Akanksha Mehta, Maria Khristine Alvarez, Margarida Nzuzi Waco & Emil Madsen Aaby, João Gabriell, Mapping Indigenous LA, Jaskiran Dhillon, Melanie K. Yazzie & Nick Estes, Jennifer Nez Denetdale, Joel Waters, Palestinian Youth Movement, Leya Tess, Elsa Hoover, Geraldene Blackgoat, David Eslahi.

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Cover Proletarian Fortresses

#19 THE SPACE OF ABLEISM

This volume is dedicated to a political struggle that has been too seldom addressed throughout the pages of past issues and that nevertheless very much mobilizes “the politics of space and bodies” that The Funambulist proposes to discuss: the fight against ableism. Just like structural racism should be addressed through considerations about white supremacy, and homophobia through considerations about heteronormativity, we should not consider disabled bodies without the system that creates such a category in the first place, namely ableism.

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The printed format of this 19th issue is provided with a limited-edition supplement entitled “The Architecture of Sex: Three Case Studies Beyond the Panopticon,” by Paul B. Preciado. We still have some copies left!

Contributors: Ayano Ginoza, Colin Prescod, Nathalie Muchamad, Beth Hughes & Platon Issaias, Natalie Spagnuolo, No Anger, Kengné Téguia, Sarah Gunawan, Jos Boys, David Gissen, Farah Saleh & Adrienne Hart, Lucy Satzewich, Brian Lee.

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Cover Proletarian Fortresses

#18 CARTOGRAPHY & POWER

Cartography & Power is the eighteenth issue of The Funambulist. Just like architecture, cartography does not constitute a neutral discipline that can be equally used to implement either state violence or resistive endeavors. Cartography is inherently an instrument of power and, as such, it has the propensity to facilitate the violence of military and administrative operations. All contributors to this issue begin with this axiom and seek for methods of mapping that can serve political struggles mobilizing against the dominant order.

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Contributors: Caren Kaplan, Moad Musbahi, Ahmad Barclay, Patrick Jaojoco, Rasheedah Phillips, Lucía Jalón Oyarzun, Bouchra Khalili, Elise Misao Hunchuck, Piper Bernbaum, Fabiana Ex-Souza, Lebogang Mokoena, Irmgard Emmelhainz.

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Cover Proletarian Fortresses

#17 WEAPONIZED INFRASTRUCTURE

This issue’s articles describing the role of infrastructure in colonial projects in Canada, Singapore, Central Asia, Kurdistan, and Colombia illustrate such a strategy. Other contributions describe the geopolitics of narrowness materialized by the Suez Canal, the Gulf of Aden, and the Strait of Hormuz in the maritime globalized capitalist project, the story of Soviet infrastructural remains in Southern Armenia, the construction of a notion of “infrastructure of intimacy” in the context of the Israeli destruction of Palestinian homes, and the project of rehabilitation of the toxified Euphrates River between Syria and Iraq.

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Contributors: Deborah Cowen, Charmaine Chua, Solveig Suess, Begüm Adalet, Zannah Mæ Matson, Laleh Khalili, Rouzbeh Akhbari & Felix Kalmenson, Sabrien Amrov, Malak Al-Faraj & Leyla Oz, Nay Saysourinho, Chanelle Adams, Rami Abdel Moula, Dubravka Sekulic.

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Cover Proletarian Fortresses

#16 PROLETARIAN FORTRESSES

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Proletarian Fortresses is an issue that proposes a resolutely political reading of self-built neighborhoods, appropriated architectures, refugee camps, and worker quarters. Constructed against the humanitarian and romanticizing orientalist narratives, it insists that these urban forms exist in the tension of what they are prevented to be by various embodiment of state violence and what they succeed in being thanks to their residents’ daily resistance.

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Contributors: Jaime A. Alves, Soraya El Kahlaoui, L’Uzine, Ahmed al Shanti, Ahmad Alaqra, Sharon Lam, Desirée Valadares, Ana Naomi de Sousa & António Brito Guterres, Henry Shah,Majed Abdulsamad, Jun Seong Ahn, Maria Isabel Carrasco, & Haochen Yang, Aleksander Nowak,Ida Helen Skogstad, Ula Iruretagoiena & Ibon Salaberria, Parsa Sajid, Marisol LeBrón & Javier Arbona.

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Cover Architecture & Colonialism

#12 RACIALIZED INCARCERATION

This issue demonstrates that incarceration is one of the horizons of processes of racialization and that architecture is an unsurpassable instrument of its enforcement. Through historical examples (concentration camps of Romani people in France, prison cities of Japanese and Japanese American people in the United States, an Aborigene prison in Australia) and contemporary ones (US prison industrial complex, immigrant detention centers in Canada, Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon), it intends to illustrate how the violence of colonial and structural forms of racism endure time and materialize in space.

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Contributors: Nicolás Vidal, Sarover Zaidi, Suzannah Victoria Beatrice Henty, Lynne Horiuchi, Desirée Valadares, Mohamad-Ali Nayel, Michelle Bui, S.K. Hussan, Orisanmi Burton, Stella Ioannidou, & Zachary White.

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Cover Architecture & Colonialism

#11 DESIGNED DESTRUCTIONS

The eleventh issue is dedicated to the precise and strategic political order behind the apparent disorder of debris and ruin in various geographical and historical contexts. The current situations of systematic destruction historically and currently experienced by Syrian and Palestinian populations provides a core to this issue to which are added accounts of the Uyghur, Tamil, and Black American struggles respectively in Xinjiang, Eelam, and the United States, as well as historical descriptions of survival bodies in Sarajevo and monument desecration in West Africa and the Carribeans.

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Contributors: Tarek Lakhrissi, Tentative Collective, Helene Kazan, Bhakti Shringarpure, Lynda Zein, P. Reyhan, Edith Roux, Alicia Olushola Ajayi, Armina Pilav, Eyal Weizman, Sinthujan Varatharajah, Eva Schreiner.

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Cover Design & Racism

#9 ISLANDS

This issue attempts to amplify the voices of indigenous narratives, as well as on non-colonial protocols of passage on these islands, like in the cases of displaced persons in the Mediterranean Sea or the Indian Ocean. Whether they are the settings of decolonizing and demilitarizing struggles or of the economization and incarceration of displaced lives or places that even face the threat of absolute disappearance, the narratives voiced in this issue are simultaneously asymmetric regarding the forces against which they are mobilized, and united in a continuously reaffirmed urgency that always sooner or later topples these forces.

Contributors: Fathima Cader, Elise Hunchuck, K. Kamakaoka’ilima Long, Françoise Vergès, Hamid Mokaddem, Lizzie Yarina, Melissa Fernández Arrigoitia, Wendy Matsumura, Greg Barton, Alison Mountz, Embassy for the Displaced, Kamil Dalkir, Rosa Rogina, Christina Varvia.

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Cover Design & Racism

#8 POLICE

This eighth issue of The Funambulist Magazine can be read in continuity with Issue 04 (March-April 2016), which was focused on carceral environments. Its axiomatic editorial line is resolutely the same: just as there cannot be “better prisons,” there cannot be “better police,” at least not within the logics through which they are currently operating in a majority of the world’s societies.
Contributors: Katherine Merriman, Ather Zia, Nick Estes, Jehan Bseiso, Christina Heatherton, Susana Durão, Sinthujan Varatharajah, Mathieu Rigouste, Jacob Burns, Whitney Hansley, and Joséphine Larere.

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Cover Design & Racism

#7 HEALTH STRUGGLES

Health Struggles is dedicated to health-related political struggles. Its editorial line does not approach the concept of health merely as that which prevents a body from dying but, rather, as the most incarnate level of politics since it tend to mobilize the very biologies of the bodies it takes for object. For this same reason, it is also a domain where the norm shows the highest degrees of crystalization in its stigmatization of some bodies over others. This issue attempts to disrupt the normative conception of what a functioning body is.

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Contributors: Alex Shams, Christina Yi, Zahra Ali, Merve Bedir, Blanca Pujals, Lori Brown, Banu Bargu, Che Gossett, Noémie Aulombard, Momoyo Homma, Piergianna Mazzocca, and Giulia Tomasello.

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Cover Militarized Cities Print

#2 SUBURBAN-GEOGRAPHIES

Suburban politics are specific to each country and city, and this issue only examines some of them. However, they all share a geographical distance from city centers whether forced on their inhabitants or chosen by them. Both of these distances are profoundly political, and their urban and architectural materializations require a thorough examination of the way they interact with the bodies they host.

Contributors: Hacène Belmessous, Tina Grandinetti, Angelo Fick, Antonádia Borges, Olivia Ahn, Karen Tongson, Adel Tincelin, Alejandro Cantera López and Henri Bony.

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Cover Militarized Cities

#1 MILITARIZED CITIES

The first issue is dedicated to militarized cities, arguing that the case studies presented here are only extreme incarnations of the collaboration between military and urban planning logics: each city carries in itself a certain degree of militarization. It was conceived a few weeks after a state of emergency had been declared on the city of Baltimore, targeting in particular the Black neighborhoods of the city. Such states of emergency, whether in the United States or elsewhere, are manifest of how a city, through its architecture, which organizes bodies in space, already contained most of the physical components for its urban space to be militarized.

Contributors: Mona Fawaz, Mona Harb & Ahmad Gharbieh, Sadia Shirazi, Mohamed Elshahed, Demilit (Javier Arbona, Bryan Finoki & Nick Sowers), Nora Akawi, Philippe Theophanidis, James Martin, Zulaikha Ayub, Maeve Elder & Ylan Vo.

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