The Funambulist 38 Featured

Music and the Revolution

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Welcome to our last 2021 issue! It is dedicated to the relationship between music and the movements of liberation. Its gorgeous cover was created for us by Pola Maneli. In the issue, you’ll find a 10-page “carte blanche” offered to Chimurenga entitled “Liberation Dance: When Tarzan Met the African Freedom Fighter,” a text and cartography of North African music labels in Paris by Hajer Ben Boubaker, two interviews of Rocé (“By the Wretched of the Earth”) and Elias & Yousef Anastas (Radio Alhara), four articles about Afro-Colombia sound systems (Edna Martinez), Indian classical music & casteism (Avdhesh Babaria), Pan-African rap in West Africa (Inem Richardson), as well as six short texts around one song from Romania (Ioanida Costache), Algeria (Lydia Haddag), Chile (Lissell Quiroz), the U.S. (Tao Leigh Goffe), Australia (Léuli Eshrāghi), and France (Léopold Lambert).

This issue’s “News from the Fronts” tackles the Chagossian struggle (Audrey Albert & Shane Ah-Siong), the fight by/for migrants and refugees in Naples (Movimento Migranti e Rifugiati Napoli), and the organizing work of Southern Solidarity between New Orleans and New York (Jasmine Araujo).

This issue is now in full open-access. You can read each article’s online version by clicking on the features below.

Past Issues

The Funambulist 43 Featured
43

Diasporas

Political Imaginaries of Afro-Diasporic, Indentured, Exiled, and Landless Communities. Narratives from the Cape Verdean, Korean, Indian, Vietnamese, Jewish, Eelam Tamil, Chinese, and the Black Atlantic diasporas.

The Funambulist 41 Featured
41

Decentering the U.S.

Thinking pluriversally through Blackness, queerness, brownness, caste & indigeneity from other geographies than the United States.

Cropped The Funambulist 37 Featured
37

Against Genocide (guest edited by Zoé Samudzi)

Open Access

A special issue guest edited by Zoé Samudzi constructing a dialogue between genocidal histories in Zimbabwe, Brazil, Ethiopia, Korea, Namibia, the U.S., Artsakh and more... while critiquing the legal and political concept of genocide as calibrated on eurocentric criteria.